St. Lawrence Lowlands

St. Lawrence Lowlands

Thanks to the temperate effect of the Great Lakes (containing one fifth of the world’s fresh water), the St. Lawrence Lowlands comprises a relatively warm and rich agricultural landscape in which half of all Canadians live today.

Flanked between the Canadian Shield to the north and the Appalachian to the east, the St. Lawrence Lowlands is Canada’s smallest physiographic region, comprising 1.8% (180,000 km2) of Canada’s surface land mass. The temperate effects of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie extend the frost free growing season creating the prime agricultural landscape of the Niagara peninsula, where grape, peach, pear, and cherry orchards thrive.

Long before European settlers arrived to the area, North American native peoples had learned to tap the lifeblood of local indigenous hardwood trees, utilizing the now famous maple sap of todays maple sugar and maple syrup acclaim. The iconic red autumn leaves of these trees have become Canada’s national symbol on the flag. The stable climate, rich agricultural resources, and the ready supply of 1/5 of the world’s fresh water, make this relatively small area of Ontario and Southern Quebec one of Canada’s most densely populated regions - containing 50% of all Canadians and producing 70% of all manufacturing.